17-hydroxysteroide im 24-std-urin

AB - Estradiol (E2) stimulates the growth and inflammation in the ectopic endometriotic tissue that commonly resides on the pelvic organs. Several clinical and laboratory-based observations are indicative of resistance to progesterone action in endometriosis. The molecular basis of progesterone resistance in endometriosis may be related to an overall reduction in the levels of progesterone receptor (PR). In normal endometrium, progesterone acts via PR on stromal cells to induce secretion of paracrine factor(s) that in turn stimulate neighboring epithelial cells to express the enzyme 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (HSD17B2). HSD17B2 is an extremely efficient enzyme and rapidly metabolizes the biologically potent estrogen E2 to weakly estrogenic estrone. In endometriotic tissue, progesterone is incapable of inducing epithelial HSD17B2 expression due to a defect in stromal cells. The inability of endometriotic stromal cells to produce progesterone-induced paracrine factors that stimulate HSD17B2 may be due to the very low levels of PR observed in vivo in endometriotic tissue. The end result is deficient metabolism of E2 in endometriosis giving rise to high local concentrations of this mitogen. The molecular details of this physiological paracrine interaction between the stroma and epithelium in normal endometrium and its lack thereof in endometriosis are discussed.

Human parotid and submandibular glands showed no 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 alpha-HSD) activity. The 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 beta-HSD) and the 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17 beta-HSD) appeared intensely reactive in the duct epithelia of the male and female glands and weakly reactive in the acinar cells of the female ones. The failure to demonstrate 3 alpha-HSD activity indicates that in-vivo androgen activation, if present at all, is not so marked as in target organs. The different distribution of the 3 beta-HSD and 17 beta-HSD in the two sexes can be related not only to the oxidation of androgens but also to the metabolism of the female hormones. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) do not seem to be specifically influenced by the sex hormones as their pattern of distribution showed no sex differences.

Steroid 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase III (17β-HSD3) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that usually presents in patients with a 46,XY karyotype with ambiguous genitalia at birth. The 17β-HSD3 enzyme, which is encoded by the HSD17B3 gene, converts gonadal delta-4 androstenedione (Δ4) to testosterone (T). Such 17β-HSD3 enzyme deficiency is expected to lead to an increased ratio of D4 to T when the patient undergoes a human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation (hCG) test. Two patients with 46,XY disorders of sexual differentiation were studied. Serum D4 and T levels were measured by HPLC tandem mass spectrometry. As one of the patients was born to consanguineous parents, we performed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray to analyze regions of homozygosity (ROH). The HSD17B3 gene was sequenced using the Sanger method. Contrary to expectations, both patients demonstrated decreased D4/T ratio after hCG stimulation. Initial sequencing results for the androgen receptor or 5α-reductase were negative for mutations. ROH analysis identified HSD17B3 as a candidate gene that might cause the disease. Sanger sequencing of the HSD17B3 gene confirmed 17β-HSD3 deficiency in both patients. Serum D4/T ratios are not reliable parameters for the diagnosis of 17β-HSD3 deficiency. Molecular genetic analysis provides accurate diagnosis.

17-hydroxysteroide im 24-std-urin

17-hydroxysteroide im 24-std-urin

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