Consequences of steroid use in professional sports

A babe from Down Under who works as a veterinary nurse by day and a topless waitress by night was busted, along with her boyfriend, for allegedly importing a cocktail of illegal steroids and growth hormones, a charge that landed them behind bars. Nateesha Barlin, 22, and Dyllan Shaw of New South Wales were arrested when their homes were raided by police on suspicion that the pair had been smuggling performance-enhancing drugs into the country. Nateesha's bust is the result of a two-year sting operation that was carried out by the Australian Border Force, which discovered a whopping 17 shipments associated with the topless waitress that contained illicit substances. So far, the court has only charged Barlin with one count in relation to importing 200 milliliters of anabolic steroids, a crime that carries a maximum sentence of five years in jail, a fine of $180,000, or both, depending on how lenient the judge is feeling. Her boyfriend took the brunt of the responsibility: Shaw was charged with five counts in relation to importing the rest of the illegal drugs, which officials believe would have ended up circulating throughout Australia’s black market for performance-enhancing drugs. Both Barlin and Shaw had their initial court date this week, where they were released on bail and left the premises separately. They will next appear before a judge in March. Australian officials have used the couple as a cautionary tale for others who would take or distribute these kinds of drugs, with ABF Commander of Immigration and Customs Enforcement Anthony Seebach warning about stern “consequences” for wannabe steroid kingpins.

Epidural steroid injections are most commonly used in situations of radicular pain, which is a radiating pain that is transmitted away from the spine by an irritated spinal nerve. Irritation of a spinal nerve in the low back ( lumbar radiculopathy ), such as from lumbar spinal stenosis , cervical spinal stenosis, herniated disc , and foraminal encroachment, causes back pain that goes down the leg. Epidural injection is also used as a minimally invasive procedure to treat nerve compression in the neck (cervical spine), referred to as cervical radiculopathy , which causes pain.

There is also the secondary issue that hormonal pills can lead to chemically induced miscarriages/abortions, even if that is not the intent of the user. The hormones can prevent a fertilized egg from implanting in the uterus. I do agree with those who see problems in altering the hormonal balance in a woman's body, which leads to this abortifacient action.

So while I would take exception to the Catholic/Fundamentalist Quiverfull prohibition against condoms, I would agree with their condemnation of hormonal birth control pills.

Laws and Penalties:  Concerns over growing illegal AAS abuse by teenagers, and many of the just discussed long-term effects, led Congress in 1991 to place the whole AAS class of drugs into Schedule III of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA).  Under this legislation, AAS are defined as any drug or hormonal substance, chemically and pharmacologically related to T (other than estrogens, progestins, and corticosteroids) that promotes muscle growth.  The possession or sale of AAS without a valid prescription is illegal.  Since 1991, simple possession of illegally obtained AAS carry a maximum penalty of one year in prison and a minimum $1,000 fine if this is an individual’s first drug offense.  The maximum penalty for trafficking (selling or possessing enough to be suspected of selling) is five years in prison and a fine of $250,000 if this is the individual’s first felony drug offense.  If this is the second felony drug offense, the maximum period of imprisonment and the maximum fine both double.  While the above listed penalties are for federal offenses, individual states have also implemented fines and penalties for illegal use of AAS.  State executive offices have also recognized the seriousness of AAS abuse and other drugs of abuse in schools. For example, the State of Virginia enacted a law that will allow student drug testing as a legitimate school drug prevention program (48, 49).

Consequences of steroid use in professional sports

consequences of steroid use in professional sports

Laws and Penalties:  Concerns over growing illegal AAS abuse by teenagers, and many of the just discussed long-term effects, led Congress in 1991 to place the whole AAS class of drugs into Schedule III of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA).  Under this legislation, AAS are defined as any drug or hormonal substance, chemically and pharmacologically related to T (other than estrogens, progestins, and corticosteroids) that promotes muscle growth.  The possession or sale of AAS without a valid prescription is illegal.  Since 1991, simple possession of illegally obtained AAS carry a maximum penalty of one year in prison and a minimum $1,000 fine if this is an individual’s first drug offense.  The maximum penalty for trafficking (selling or possessing enough to be suspected of selling) is five years in prison and a fine of $250,000 if this is the individual’s first felony drug offense.  If this is the second felony drug offense, the maximum period of imprisonment and the maximum fine both double.  While the above listed penalties are for federal offenses, individual states have also implemented fines and penalties for illegal use of AAS.  State executive offices have also recognized the seriousness of AAS abuse and other drugs of abuse in schools. For example, the State of Virginia enacted a law that will allow student drug testing as a legitimate school drug prevention program (48, 49).

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