Cutivate steroid class

The corticosteroids are a class of compounds comprising steroid hormones secreted by the adrenal cortex and their synthetic analogs. In pharmacologic doses, corticosteroids are used primarily for their anti-inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive effects. Topical corticosteroids such as clobetasol propionate are effective in the treatment of corticosteroid-responsive dermatoses primarily because of their anti-inflammatory, antipruritic, and vasoconstrictive actions. However, while the physiologic , pharmacologic, and clinical effects of the corticosteroids are well known, the exact mechanisms of their actions in each disease are uncertain.

Molecules from one group differ sufficiently from other groups to explain the lack of cross-reactions among groups A, B & D. However, Budesonide which belongs to Group B is well known to cross-react with Group D steroids . Therefore, Budesonide is a marker for Group B and some of Group D steroids, like hydrocortisone butyrate (locoid). Molecular structure is not the whole story since cross-reaction patterns differ from patient to patient. Also, because of metabolism and degradation, several different molecules can be formed, resulting from reactions from the degradation product and not the parent compound. Because of the difficulty of predicting cross reactions, when hypersensitivity to one steroid is demonstrated all the steroids available in New Zealand should be tested, in order to recommend a valid alternative.

Other Corticosteroid-Responsive Dermatoses: Apply a thin film of Fluticasone Propionate Cream to the affected skin areas twice daily. Rub in gently.

As with other corticosteroids, therapy should be discontinued when control is achieved. If no improvement is seen within 2 weeks, reassessment of diagnosis may be necessary.

Fluticasone Propionate Cream should not be used with occlusive dressings. Fluticasone Propionate Cream should not be applied in the diaper area, as diapers or plastic pants may constitute occlusive dressings.

Primidone, along with phenytoin and phenobarbital, is one of the anticonvulsants most heavily associated with bone diseases such as osteoporosis , osteopenia (which can precede osteoporosis), osteomalacia and fractures. [34] [35] [36] The populations usually said to be most at risk are institutionalized people, postmenopausal women, older men, people taking more than one anticonvulsant, and children, who are also at risk of rickets . [34] However, it has been suggested that bone demineralization is most pronounced in young people (25–44 years of age) [35] and one 1987 study of institutionalized people found that the rate of osteomalacia in the ones taking anticonvulsants—one out of nineteen individuals taking an anticonvulsant (vs. none among the thirty-seven people taking none) —was similar to that expected in elderly people. The authors speculated that this was due to improvements in diet, sun exposure and exercise in response to earlier findings, and/or that this was because it was sunnier in London than in the Northern European countries which had earlier reported this effect. [36] In any case, the use of more than one anticonvulsant has been associated with an increased prevalence of bone disease in institutionalized epilepsy patients versus institutionalized people who did not have epilepsy. Likewise, postmenopausal women taking anticonvulsants have a greater risk of fracture than their drug-naive counterparts. [34]

Cutivate steroid class

cutivate steroid class

Primidone, along with phenytoin and phenobarbital, is one of the anticonvulsants most heavily associated with bone diseases such as osteoporosis , osteopenia (which can precede osteoporosis), osteomalacia and fractures. [34] [35] [36] The populations usually said to be most at risk are institutionalized people, postmenopausal women, older men, people taking more than one anticonvulsant, and children, who are also at risk of rickets . [34] However, it has been suggested that bone demineralization is most pronounced in young people (25–44 years of age) [35] and one 1987 study of institutionalized people found that the rate of osteomalacia in the ones taking anticonvulsants—one out of nineteen individuals taking an anticonvulsant (vs. none among the thirty-seven people taking none) —was similar to that expected in elderly people. The authors speculated that this was due to improvements in diet, sun exposure and exercise in response to earlier findings, and/or that this was because it was sunnier in London than in the Northern European countries which had earlier reported this effect. [36] In any case, the use of more than one anticonvulsant has been associated with an increased prevalence of bone disease in institutionalized epilepsy patients versus institutionalized people who did not have epilepsy. Likewise, postmenopausal women taking anticonvulsants have a greater risk of fracture than their drug-naive counterparts. [34]

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