Inhaled corticosteroids moon face

Oral and injectable systemic corticosterois are steroid hormones prescribed to decrease inflammation in diseases and conditions such as arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis, for example), ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, asthma, bronchitis, some skin rashes, and allergic or inflammatory conditions that involve the nose and eyes. Examples of systemic corticosteroids include hydrocortisone (Cortef), cortisone, prednisone (Prednisone Intensol), prednisolone (Orapred, Prelone), and methylprednisolone (Medrol, Depo-Medrol, Solu-Medrol). Some of the side effects of systemic corticosteroids are swelling of the legs, hypertension, headache, easy bruising, facial hair growth, diabetes, cataracts, and puffiness of the face.

30 mg/kg/dose (Max: 1 gram/dose) IV or IM once daily for 1 to 3 days. High-dose pulse steroids may be considered as an alternative to a second infusion of IVIG or for retreatment of patients who have had recurrent or recrudescent fever after additional IVIG, but should not be used as routine primary therapy with IVIG in patients with Kawasaki disease. Corticosteroid treatment has been shown to shorten the duration of fever in patients with IVIG-refractory Kawasaki disease or patients at high risk for IVIG-refractory disease. A reduction in the frequency and severity of coronary artery lesions has also been reported with pulse dose methylprednisolone treatment.

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  • Citation tools Download this article to citation manager Park Hye Yun , Man S F Paul , Sin Don D . Inhaled corticosteroids for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease BMJ 2012; 345 :e6843
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    Normally the adrenal glands release cortisol into the blood stream every morning. The brain monitors this amount and regulates the adrenal function. It cannot tell the difference between its own natural cortisone and that of steroid medicines. Therefore, when a person takes high doses of steroids over a long time, the brain may decrease or stop cortisol production. This is called adrenal suppression. Healthcare providers generally decrease a steroid dosage slowly to allow the adrenal gland to recover and produce cortisol at a normal level again. If you have been on steroids long-term do not stop taking them suddenly. Follow your doctor's prescription.

    Inhaled corticosteroids moon face

    inhaled corticosteroids moon face

    Normally the adrenal glands release cortisol into the blood stream every morning. The brain monitors this amount and regulates the adrenal function. It cannot tell the difference between its own natural cortisone and that of steroid medicines. Therefore, when a person takes high doses of steroids over a long time, the brain may decrease or stop cortisol production. This is called adrenal suppression. Healthcare providers generally decrease a steroid dosage slowly to allow the adrenal gland to recover and produce cortisol at a normal level again. If you have been on steroids long-term do not stop taking them suddenly. Follow your doctor's prescription.

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